Carey Mulligan OnlineYour Original Fansite Resource for Carey Mulligan

We had a bit of a problem with the old Video Archive, so I have just finished creating a new one which looks slightly nicer than the original did! I have re-added all the old videos, and have started added some new clips. First up is Shame – due to the content/language, there are only two short clips, but one of them is the full 5-minute rendition of Carey singing New York, New York. More on the way, so stay tuned!

I have just added 499 HD/Blu-Ray quality screen captures of Carey from her 2011 drama Shame, which she starred as the emotionally-damaged Sissy, alongside the fantastic Michael Fassbender. Remember to pre-order your copy of the film, UK visitors can order here (with a release date of May 14) and US visitors can order here (with a release date of April 17). Enjoy!

Please note that many of these captures contain graphic imagery and nudity and are therefore NOT SAFE FOR WORK.

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Film Productions > Shame (2011) > Screen Captures (Blu-Ray)

Johnny Depp and Rob Marshall are working to make a new version of The Thin Man, the Dashiell Hammett novel about drunk detective socialite Nick Charles, his charming young wife Nora and the unusual family mystery in which they become embroiled.

The question is: who plays Nora? Deadline says there is a shortlist that will begin to meet with Warner Bros. next week. Names on the list include Eva Green, Amy Adams, Emma Stone, Carey Mulligan, Rachel Weisz, Kristen Wiig, Emily Blunt and Isla Fisher. That is, just about every smart actress with free time in her schedule and an interest in starring opposite one of the few semi-legit movie stars in the business. And without knowing more about what Marshall, Depp and WB are specifically looking for, it seems pointless to try to play the guessing game based on a list that long.

The original The Thin Man, released in 1934, spawned a series of comic detective films and, later, even a TV show, and that precedent is fueling fire that the material might become a hit once again.

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Okay, so it looks as though most film/media blogs are calling this the first official poster, but it looks as though it’s just a fan made one. What a pity! It’s a gorgeous shot, and really sets the tone of the film – so enjoy it anyway!

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Film Productions > The Great Gatsby (2012) > Posters

Controversial movie Shame and redemption drama Tyrannosaur are set for glory at the Evening Standard British Film Awards after picking up four nominations each.

Steve McQueen’s story about a sex addict is up for Best Film, Best Actor for Michael Fassbender, Best Actress for Carey Mulligan, and the Technical Achievement award.

It’s a double delight for Fassbender, who receives a second Best Actor nod for his role in Jane Eyre, alongside fellow nominees Kenneth Branagh (My Week With Marilyn), Gary Oldman (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), Peter Mullan (Tyrannosaur), Brendan Gleeson (The Guard), and Tom Hiddleston (Archipelago).

In the Best Actress category, Mulligan will compete with Vanessa Redgrave for her role in Coriolanus, Tilda Swinton (We Need to Talk About Kevin), Rachel Weisz (The Deep Blue Sea), Samantha Morton (The Messenger), and Olivia Colman (Tyrannosaur).

The 2012 Evening Standard British Film Awards will be presented at a ceremony in London on 6 February.

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The lovely Carey Mulligan has been nominated for a BAFTA! She is nominated for Supporting Actress for her role of Irene in Drive, though some sources are saying it’s for her role in Shame.

Supporting Actress

Carey Mulligan – Drive
Jessica Chastain – The Help
Judi Dench – My Week With Marilyn
Melissa McCarthy – Bridesmaids
Octavia Spencer – The Help

Shame has been nominated for Outstanding British Film and Leading Actor (Michael Fassbender), whilst Drive has been nominated for Best Film and Director (Nicholas Winding Refn). Congraulations and best of luck to everyone involved with both films! The results will be announced on February 12 at the Royal Opera House in London.

In the 1970s, through 1980, the photographer Francesca Woodman made images of young women, most often herself, in a blurry, foggy, subliminal state. She called one famous series her ghost pictures. They were achieved through slow shutter speeds, which meant that instead of being the record of a blinked instant, they captured movement through time and mid-air: in one a female figure leans forward, body flexed, awkward, in fizzing focus, while her head shakes frantically, blurrily, as if ridding herself of a wasp. Many of the figures are almost transparent. I am here, they insist. But watch me disappear.

When Carey Mulligan was working on her latest film, Shame, she saw a documentary about the Woodman family and Francesca’s work inspired her character Sissy – a damaged, needy, tinnily upbeat young woman, whose singing act becomes her last desperate attempt to forge a relationship with her brother. When she is working on a film, says Mulligan, she often makes scrapbooks for her character. “It really is so childish. It’s like my way of saying,” – she puts on a child’s voice – “‘I’m qualified!’ … I had little Woodman pictures in the book, stuff like that.” Her voice goes quiet. “If anyone ever read them I’d be mortified because they’re just full of shit. They’re not clever and there’s nothing creative in them. It’s just me reassuring myself.”

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In the last year, Carey Mulligan appeared in two much-admired movies, “Drive” and “Shame,” and gave an acclaimed performance in “Through a Glass Darkly,” a stage adaptation of Ingmar Bergman’s 1961 film. But before that run, she hadn’t worked for nearly a year, disatisfied with the scripts she was receiving. “Everything seemed exactly the same as stuff I’d been doing,” she told the Bagger recently.

Since her breakout turn in “An Education” in 2009, Ms. Mulligan has played a lot of characters who have a sense of desperation – if not despair — and Sissy in “Shame,” directed by Steve McQueen, certainly fit the bill. But Ms. Mulligan saw another side of her.

“She’s hopeful,” Ms. Mulligan said. “She sort of reminded me of me in that respect. She keeps on getting knocked back and she keeps trying. She never sees that her life is limited, she doesn’t know that she’s not talented enough to be a singer, or to be an actress. That’s how they rang similar to me, that’s probably why I was so drawn to thing.”

She laughed. That striving, she said, “bears repeating in all of my work.”

Here, Ms. Mulligan talks to our colleague Charles McGrath about “Shame,” acting in theater vs. film and her attraction to characters on the verge of madness.

Click here to view the TimesTalk interview.

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