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Thanks to our lovely friend Luciana I’ve just added scans of Carey Mulligan from May’s issue of Empire. It’s lovely to see Carey in a magazine again, with a new photoshoot as well.

Carey Mulligan describes her trip through the war-ravaged Democratic Republic of Congo and the inspiring children she met along the way.

In October I traveled to the Democratic Republic of Congo as a global ambassador for War Child UK, a worldwide network of humanitarian organizations focusing on children traumatized by war. Abandoned half-built buildings, abandoned half-destroyed buildings, and slums form the bulk of the cityscape of Goma, on the border with Rwanda. Nothing works. Corruption, power outages, and impassable roads—and the palpable threat of chaos—are part of daily life. One in ten children born today in the DRC won’t live to see a fifth birthday. Since the outbreak of fighting in 1998, 5.4 million people have died there.

Within these dire conditions I saw the extraordinary work of War Child and met children who, despite every element working against them, astonished me with their warmth, intelligence, determination, and desire to build a better life. I met Grace, a thirteen-year-old orphan with cerebral palsy who, having been abandoned by her stepmother, was found on the streets by a kind stranger who called the War Child help line. Children who have been forced to carry weapons as child soldiers, who have lost everyone they love, or who have been victims of sexual violence can call this number and get referrals and counsel from trained social workers. Through counseling sessions, Grace’s stepmother was encouraged to care for her again—but just a few months after their reconciliation, Grace stepped on a rusty nail and, because of the almost completely defunct health-care system in the DRC, was hospitalized only after it was too late to save her leg.

Along with a team from War Child, I walked into a dark hospital room with four other beds, shook Grace’s hand, and sat by her side. We talked to her about her life before the accident; about going to school. Her eyes lit up when she showed me the two scrappy school textbooks that were her most prized possessions—she told me she loved to read, and that she wanted more than anything to continue her education. The stench of the place was overwhelming; my jeans quickly became wet with the urine that soaked Grace’s mattress. As we talked, a brusque doctor thrust a hospital bill for $2,000 (and counting) into my hands and said that Grace wouldn’t be allowed to leave until it was paid. Grace’s stepmother—haunted, drawn, incapable of communicating—simply wept. She told me that even if the bill was paid, they would have nowhere to go.

Within weeks, a plan developed by War Child began to unfold. Grace’s hospital bills were negotiated down in partnership with the local government and will be paid by War Child, which is also in talks with other local agencies specializing in children with disabilities, so that when she left the hospital she was able to receive the specialist care she needs. Grace is a very smart girl, and once she has recovered she’ll be given help to get back into school to finish her education. In short, thanks to War Child, Grace—along with thousands of other children in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Gaza, Jordan, and Uganda—will have the chance of a future again.

For children who live with trauma, fear, and grief amidst wars they should have no part of, War Child is there to give them comfort, tell them they are not alone, remind them that there are people around the world who care about them and will do everything they can to keep them safe.?

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The big-screen star dazzled on stage this summer in Skylight. Before the play transfers to Broadway, she talks to Abi Morgan, the award-winning screenwriter who created a role especially for her in the forthcoming Suffragette.

Meeting Carey Mulligan for the first time at the British Independent Film Awards in 2010, the writer Abi Morgan (who penned The Hour and The Iron Lady) recalls a girl who was ‘giddy, very smiley, lovely and sweet’. Mulligan had just agreed to appear in Shame, which Morgan co-wrote. Mulligan’s role in 2009’s An Education had already made her a star, but it was Shame, directed by Steve McQueen, that marked out her trajectory as probably the most fearless actress of her generation. ‘Raw’ is the word Morgan uses to describe her performance.

This year, West End audiences got to see that rawness in the flesh, when Mulligan took to the stage opposite Bill Nighy in a revival of David Hare’s Skylight. Reviews were justly glowing. Mulligan was a revelation. (The production transfers to Broadway next March.) Over the past year, the 29-year-old actress, who lives between London and a farm in Devon with her musician husband Marcus Mumford (of Mumford & Sons), has also finished shooting Far from the Madding Crowd, directed by Thomas Vinterberg, in which she lays Thomas Hardy’s wilful heroine Bathsheba Everdene, and Suffragette, also written by Morgan and directed by Sarah Gavron, about the early years of the British suffrage movement. Audiences will have to wait until mid-2015 to see those performances.

In September, a week after the London run of Skylight ended, Morgan and Mulligan sat down for breakfast at Electric House in west London to discuss Suffragette, their peripatetic childhoods (Mulligan is the daughter of a hotelier; Morgan of a touring actress), the strains of public life and Mulligan’s incredible career, past and to come.

Gallery Links
Press > 2014 > Dec | Harper’s Bazaar
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2014 > Session 003

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Carey Mulligan is set to be the cover star of the Harper’s Bazaar December UK issue. It appears as though no official images have been released yet, but a number of subscriber-only covers have been spotted up on Instagram, including the one below from worlds_moda – isn’t it gorgeous? Hopefully more images from the shoot will arrive online soon.

harpersbazaar2014

Carey is appearing in the June issue of Vogue UK, looking lovely as always. I can only find a MQ scan so far, but hopefully something larger will be online soon!

Gallery Links
Press > 2014 > Jun | Vogue UK

Late last September, Carey Mulligan stood on the stage at the Town Hall in New York surrounded by some of the most famous musicians in the world—including her husband, Marcus Mumford, of Mumford & Sons, Patti Smith, and Joan Baez—and she looked as if she might faint. “I was terrified to sing in that company,” Mulligan recalled two months later, still sounding shaky and awestruck. She was on her way to the airport in Los Angeles, about to return home to London, where she had recently filmed Far From the Madding Crowd, an adaptation of the Thomas Hardy novel. The film represents a return to Mulligan’s British roots: In 2013, she played the iconic American character Daisy Buchanan in The Great Gatsby, as well as Jean Berkey, a complex American folksinger in Joel and Ethan Coen’s Inside Llewyn Davis. “I wasn’t sure I could do the part,” Mulligan said of the latter. “I was so immersed in the fantasy world of Daisy. I finished Gatsby on a Friday afternoon, and by the weekend I was in a long wig filming Llewyn Davis in Washington Square Park.” Mulligan appreciated being able to stomp around in a trenchcoat after all the Gatsby gowns and jewels. “As Jean, I was swearing like a trooper, and the Coens would be saying, ‘More, more—make her even harsher!’?” she said, laughing. “There was never a conversation about trying to make any of the characters in Llewyn Davis likable.”

Based loosely on the autobiography of Dave Van Ronk, the film centers on an uncompromising folksinger who would rather self–destruct than sell out. Oscar Isaac, in the title role of Davis, is at once maddening and captivating. Berkey, his sometime lover and a singer herself, is envious of and angered by his artistic purity of intent. Like pretty much every Coen brothers film, Inside Llewyn Davis is the story of a beautiful American loser.

“My biggest concern was the singing,” Mulligan continued. “I was a wreck. But when T Bone Burnett [the musical producer for the film] asked me to sing 500 Miles at Town Hall, I couldn’t say no. Every time I did the song, I’d fuck it up. T Bone told me, ‘Whiskey helps.’ I hadn’t had a drink in a month, but after three sips, I was so up for singing.”

In fact, Mulligan sang beautifully at the Town Hall that night (and also in the movie) as part of Another Day, Another Time, a concert benefiting the National Recording Preservation Foundation. “The community of musicians is so enviable,” she recalled. “They walk into a room and they are immediately friends because they all play music. Actors don’t have that easy rapport—we can walk into a room and start improvising, but nobody wants that.”

When she was young, growing up in hotels all over Europe where her father worked as a manager, Mulligan, 28, often took the male roles in the all-girl schools she attended. “The men had better parts,” she told me. “The girl parts were always a bit lame.” In her professional career, she has made a point of not accepting roles as the woman in the shadow of the leading man. “I rather like being brutal in movies. I never thought it would be very interesting to play someone uncomplicated. I find if I’m not scared, then I’m probably not right for the role.”

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Thanks to the lovely Luciana, we have scans of Carey from the December 18 issue of TheWrap, where she discussed Inside Llewyn Davis and Far From the Madding Crowd. Enjoy!

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Press > 2013 > Dec 18 | TheWrap

Carey is set to cover Dazed & Confused‘s January issue, themed ‘The Modern Myths’ issue. Check out the gorgeous cover below, along with a few shots from the photoshoot and a behind the scenes video:

Gallery Links
Press > 2014 > Jan | Dazed & Confused
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2013 > Set 004

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