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Their faces grace the covers of national magazines, and heads turn when they walk down the street.

But this season, they threw themselves into revivals of two highly regarded plays, he as the physically afflicted title character in “The Elephant Man,” by Bernard Pomerance, and she as a schoolteacher in “Skylight,” by David Hare.

Bradley Cooper and Carey Mulligan, both Oscar-nominated film stars, are now both Tony Award nominees and are embracing the stage, even as they continue to manage Hollywood careers. “The Elephant Man,” which closed on Broadway in February at the end of a limited run, is transferring to London this summer; “Skylight,” which ran in London last year, is scheduled to play until June 21 in New York.

The two have never worked together, although they have had a number of cinematic near-misses: He auditioned, unsuccessfully, to portray her husband in “The Great Gatsby,” while she sought, also unsuccessfully, a role in “Silver Linings Playbook.” Ultimately, as show business would have it, they met through a shared publicist and have since become friends.

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Carey Mulligan and her co-star Matthias Schoenaerts sat down with USA Today to promote “Far From The Madding Crowd”. The print edition of the interview appeared in the April 28 issue, and you can now find the scans in our gallery. We also added the first photoshoot outtakes.

Carey Mulligan has a new tattoo. The phrase inked on the inside of her right wrist is so tiny I have to lean in to read it as she sits across from me in the airy lobby of the Crosby Street Hotel in lower Manhattan. It’s early morning, but Mulligan, 29, has already been up for hours; she’s still on London time after having just flown here for the Broadway run of David Hare’s Skylight. She apologizes for not eating anything—when her jet lag woke her at dawn, she ravenously ate breakfast. By the time we sit down, all she’s in the mood for is some Earl Grey tea, served the proper British way, with milk and one lump of sugar.

Her new tattoo—“Love That Overcometh”—is a reference from a film she recently finished shooting, Suffragette, which opens this fall. Co-starring Meryl Streep and Helena Bonham Carter, it tells the story of female activists who fought for the right to vote in Britain; the phrase on Mulligan’s wrist commemorates a suffragette who threw herself under the king’s horse in martyrdom to the cause. The tattoo was an impulsive act, she admits, but the line kept resonating in her head after shooting. “I texted a picture of this to everyone right after I got it,” says Mulligan. Even wearing no makeup and a slouchy blue cashmere sweater, her brown bob disheveled, she conveys a wry, impish quality immediately recognizable from her on-screen performances. “I sent it to Helena and Sarah [Gavron, Suffragette’s director], and they were like, ‘Holy s—! This movie had better be good now.’ ”

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Fresh from a standing ovation, Carey Mulligan sits in her Broadway dressing room, one leg tucked under the other, hair pinned back from her face, her hands almost consumed by a long pale-blue sweater. “Today was a good show,” she says with a smile. “Yesterday I didn’t feel as good about it, but today I liked.”

She is surrounded by flowers (“I got flowers from Helen Mirren, which I thought was the nicest thing ever!” she says) and jars of Marmite sent by well-wishers concerned that she might get homesick. They needn’t have worried. “I’ve always felt better in New York, doing theater,” she says. “I think because there’s no one I know in the audience—or I can believe that more comfortably than I can in London.” On the mirror behind her—written, for lack of lipstick, in Laura Mercier eyeliner—are three lines of poetry designed to embolden her: “These are our days. Walk them. Fear nothing.”

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Thanks to our lovely friend Luciana I’ve just added scans of Carey Mulligan from May’s issue of Empire. It’s lovely to see Carey in a magazine again, with a new photoshoot as well.

Carey Mulligan describes her trip through the war-ravaged Democratic Republic of Congo and the inspiring children she met along the way.

In October I traveled to the Democratic Republic of Congo as a global ambassador for War Child UK, a worldwide network of humanitarian organizations focusing on children traumatized by war. Abandoned half-built buildings, abandoned half-destroyed buildings, and slums form the bulk of the cityscape of Goma, on the border with Rwanda. Nothing works. Corruption, power outages, and impassable roads—and the palpable threat of chaos—are part of daily life. One in ten children born today in the DRC won’t live to see a fifth birthday. Since the outbreak of fighting in 1998, 5.4 million people have died there.

Within these dire conditions I saw the extraordinary work of War Child and met children who, despite every element working against them, astonished me with their warmth, intelligence, determination, and desire to build a better life. I met Grace, a thirteen-year-old orphan with cerebral palsy who, having been abandoned by her stepmother, was found on the streets by a kind stranger who called the War Child help line. Children who have been forced to carry weapons as child soldiers, who have lost everyone they love, or who have been victims of sexual violence can call this number and get referrals and counsel from trained social workers. Through counseling sessions, Grace’s stepmother was encouraged to care for her again—but just a few months after their reconciliation, Grace stepped on a rusty nail and, because of the almost completely defunct health-care system in the DRC, was hospitalized only after it was too late to save her leg.

Along with a team from War Child, I walked into a dark hospital room with four other beds, shook Grace’s hand, and sat by her side. We talked to her about her life before the accident; about going to school. Her eyes lit up when she showed me the two scrappy school textbooks that were her most prized possessions—she told me she loved to read, and that she wanted more than anything to continue her education. The stench of the place was overwhelming; my jeans quickly became wet with the urine that soaked Grace’s mattress. As we talked, a brusque doctor thrust a hospital bill for $2,000 (and counting) into my hands and said that Grace wouldn’t be allowed to leave until it was paid. Grace’s stepmother—haunted, drawn, incapable of communicating—simply wept. She told me that even if the bill was paid, they would have nowhere to go.

Within weeks, a plan developed by War Child began to unfold. Grace’s hospital bills were negotiated down in partnership with the local government and will be paid by War Child, which is also in talks with other local agencies specializing in children with disabilities, so that when she left the hospital she was able to receive the specialist care she needs. Grace is a very smart girl, and once she has recovered she’ll be given help to get back into school to finish her education. In short, thanks to War Child, Grace—along with thousands of other children in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Gaza, Jordan, and Uganda—will have the chance of a future again.

For children who live with trauma, fear, and grief amidst wars they should have no part of, War Child is there to give them comfort, tell them they are not alone, remind them that there are people around the world who care about them and will do everything they can to keep them safe.?

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The big-screen star dazzled on stage this summer in Skylight. Before the play transfers to Broadway, she talks to Abi Morgan, the award-winning screenwriter who created a role especially for her in the forthcoming Suffragette.

Meeting Carey Mulligan for the first time at the British Independent Film Awards in 2010, the writer Abi Morgan (who penned The Hour and The Iron Lady) recalls a girl who was ‘giddy, very smiley, lovely and sweet’. Mulligan had just agreed to appear in Shame, which Morgan co-wrote. Mulligan’s role in 2009’s An Education had already made her a star, but it was Shame, directed by Steve McQueen, that marked out her trajectory as probably the most fearless actress of her generation. ‘Raw’ is the word Morgan uses to describe her performance.

This year, West End audiences got to see that rawness in the flesh, when Mulligan took to the stage opposite Bill Nighy in a revival of David Hare’s Skylight. Reviews were justly glowing. Mulligan was a revelation. (The production transfers to Broadway next March.) Over the past year, the 29-year-old actress, who lives between London and a farm in Devon with her musician husband Marcus Mumford (of Mumford & Sons), has also finished shooting Far from the Madding Crowd, directed by Thomas Vinterberg, in which she lays Thomas Hardy’s wilful heroine Bathsheba Everdene, and Suffragette, also written by Morgan and directed by Sarah Gavron, about the early years of the British suffrage movement. Audiences will have to wait until mid-2015 to see those performances.

In September, a week after the London run of Skylight ended, Morgan and Mulligan sat down for breakfast at Electric House in west London to discuss Suffragette, their peripatetic childhoods (Mulligan is the daughter of a hotelier; Morgan of a touring actress), the strains of public life and Mulligan’s incredible career, past and to come.

Gallery Links
Press > 2014 > Dec | Harper’s Bazaar
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2014 > Session 003

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Carey Mulligan is set to be the cover star of the Harper’s Bazaar December UK issue. It appears as though no official images have been released yet, but a number of subscriber-only covers have been spotted up on Instagram, including the one below from worlds_moda – isn’t it gorgeous? Hopefully more images from the shoot will arrive online soon.

harpersbazaar2014

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